Young Cash Money

11.15.09 8 years ago 62 Comments
Brandon Jennings

Brandon Jennings

Thank goodness they don’t teach defense in Golden State. Otherwise, how many highlights and one-night explosions would we have been robbed of over the last few years? As great as Brandon Jennings was last night — dropping 55 points on 21-of-34 FG with seven triples — it was hard not to look at the boxscore and say, “Oh, it was against the Warriors,” and allow the fifth-best NBA rookie performance of all-time to lose some of its luster. But just a little. Jennings was doing whatever he wanted whenever he wanted; if Monta Ellis was worried about he and Stephen Curry getting lit up by bigger guards, what did he think about skinny 6-1 Young Money carving ’em up like Manny Pacquiao did Miguel Cotto? … It was pretty simple: Jennings would bring the ball up, somebody would set him a pick, his defender would go under the screen, and Jennings would hit a jumper. At some point you’d think the Warriors would play over the screen, but again, apparently they don’t teach defense in the Bay … If he doesn’t already, Donnie Walsh might want to have an intern go through his e-mail inbox and office mail over the next week or so. We’d imagine quite a few Knicks fans will want to send Walsh tapes and highlights of Jennings’ 55-point effort. Maybe they’ll even include a photo of Jordan Hill sitting on the bench … Andris Biedrins missed the game with “Osteitis Pubis.” Yes, that is exactly in the region you think it is, and it sounds exactly as painful as you think it does … The Nets didn’t guard Dwyane Wade as poorly as Golden State covered Jennings — Wade only gave them 22 points on 5-of-17 shooting — but NJ’s defense against Wade on the game’s decisive play would’ve even made Nellie scratch his head. Up by two with 4.1 seconds left after Brook Lopez scored on a tip-in, Jersey had to know who was getting the ball. And yet they decided to single-cover Wade, and he buried a three with 0.1 left to keep the Nets winless. No disrespect to Udonis Haslem and Mike Beasley and those guys, but please leave one of them open to send somebody else at Wade … Without Deron Williams in the lineup, at least give the Jazz credit for going down to the wire with the Cavs on the road. But Andrei Kirilenko might not be buying the “moral victory” thing. After Utah mounted a fourth-quarter comeback capped by Eric Maynor‘s go-ahead bucket with 41 seconds left, AK was guarding LeBron (21 pts, 6 rebs, 9 asts) on the next possession and gave up the middle as ‘Bron drove past him for an and-one to put Cleveland back up. Jazz ball, and with plenty of time left on the clock and only trailing by two, Kirilenko launched a three for no good reason that bricked. After that it was basically the LeBron free-throw show … Oh, the Cleveland fans still hate Carlos Boozer, in case you were wondering … So after knocking off the Raptors and the Mavs without Tim Duncan and Tony Parker in the lineup, of course the Spurs get TD and TP back last night and proceed to drop one at home to the Thunder. Richard Jefferson and Manu Ginobili took turns carrying the offense when San Antonio was short-handed, but last night they both played bad, combining to go 1-for-12 from the field. Manu sat out the fourth quarter with a sore hamstring, and really summing up the night, RJ had a chance at a fast-break bucket in the final 30 seconds that would have cut the OKC lead to one, but he lost control and turned the ball over. Kevin Durant scored 25 in the win … Other big stat lines from Saturday: Danny Granger scored 29 points and hit six threes as the Pacers upset the Celtics; Ben Gordon went for 29 and five triples as the Pistons beat the Wizards; Brandon Roy scored 25 to beat the Bobcats; Marc Gasol put up 17 points and 16 boards in Memphis’ win over the Wolves; Kirk Hinrich had 19 points and seven assists off the bench to beat the Sixers; and Joe Johnson scored 26 and Josh Smith posted 17 points and 17 boards as the Hawks smashed the CP-less Hornets … As for the big fight: Cotto looked alright for the first few rounds — we’ll even call the first knockdown more a result of him being off-balance than getting rocked by a hard shot — and it looked like Pacquiao was in for a battle. But everything changed in that fourth round, which Cotto was handily winning until Pacman caught him with one punch and knocked him down again. Pacman went to work after that, and once he realized Cotto’s punches didn’t really hurt him (and Cotto’s punches continued losing steam), it was only a matter of time. By the end it looked like Cotto had lost a fight with a box cutter; the ref didn’t have to stop it when he did in the 12th, but you could also argue that he should’ve stopped it sometime in the 10th or 11th … We’re out like Hill over Jennings …

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