Uproxx’s Top 20 Comics For December 16

and 12.16.15 2 years ago 4 Comments
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Marvel

Unsurprisingly, as we get close to the holidays, the publishing schedule gets a little light. But there are still some superb books on the stands this week. For example…

1) Ivar, Timewalker #12

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Valiant

Fred Van Lente and Pere Perez end their brilliant, witty time travel series on a note that’s at once sad and hilarious. It turns out there are only so many ways you can save history… and sometimes, your happy ending doesn’t matter. It’s a brilliant conclusion to a superb book, and a must-read.

2) The Goddamned #2

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Image

Jason Aaron and R.M. Guera’s retelling of the Biblical Flood is mostly about just why God decided that it was better to drown the entire world than spare human life, and let’s just say that after this issue, you’ll be rooting for God. Guera plays with caveman and barbarian comics tropes while brutally underscoring the horror of what’s going on here, while Aaron… yeesh, let’s just say don’t let this guy teach a Sunday school class. A tremendous, and slightly disturbing, comic worth reading.

3) Wrath of The Eternal Warrior #2

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Valiant

Gilad Anni-Padda is dead. And can choose to remain so, in his eternal reward, happy with his wife and children. Or he can go back and fight. Robert Venditti’s look at a man with a mission is surprisingly emotionally complex for a book that features pages of demons getting chopped up, and Raul Allen handles heaven and hell with equal aplomb. A fascinating take on what could be a conventional character.

4) Superman: American Alien #2

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DC Comics

Max Landis takes on Clark Kent, and this isn’t the nice boy we all know. He drinks beer, he’s awkward around girls, he’s just kind of a mess, like any teenage kid. But he’s still Superman, and, well, imagine you as a teenager with superpowers you barely grasp. Yeah. It gets bad. Tommy Lee Edwards does superb art here, giving the book a used, dingy feel for a fair part of it, and grounding Clark just that bit more. Whether we need another Superman origin is perhaps debatable, but Landis’ fresh take on it is a great read.

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