“Legendary” – Review Of DJ Khaled’s We The Best Forever & Ace Hood’s Blood, Sweat & Tears

By: 08.25.11  •  12 Comments

Despite gaining nationwide notoriety on the heels of 2 Live Crew’s controversial tactics, it wasn’t until the past few years that Florida could be considered a primary hub for Hip-Hop. Since then, the Sunshine State–primarily the Greater Miami area–boasts the biggest “boss,” the game’s most popular DJ, a slew of hungry trap stars and Hip-Pop sensations of both ghetto and bilingual persuasions. With Atlanta in transition mode and other regions inconsistently flashing in the pan, FLorida has the rest of the south watching their respective thrones.

Regardless of the spotlight being shone on them, some of the more visible acts still haven’t won over everybody–and for good reason. DJ Khaled and his second-in-command, Ace Hood, are on their fifth and third albums respectively, with no real legacy established aside from a handful of hit records, with that distinction going to Khaled more than his rapping counterpart. Keeping in line with his familiar model, the Miami disc jock partners his brand with Cash Money and focuses on rounding up the biggest names with total disregard for chemistry on We The Best Forever. Ace’s Blood, Sweat and Tears marks an improvement for the scrappy youngster, albeit a marginal one.

Khaled’s uncompromising manual to music-making is a simple one: find the hottest artists and let them record at random. Past installments of his projects have included the likes of Chamillionaire, Fat Joe and Jim Jones but since they’re not in the public eye at the moment, they have been replaced with acts such as Waka Flocka, B.o.B and Vado. As usual, Khaled’s biggest selling points are the singles, which sound like motivators for creating the album to begin with. Drake coolly steers through the sea of vibrant echoes for “I’m on One” with a fresh rap & blues mix-up that has radio written all over it. The T-Pain-helmed “Welcome to my Hood” marks very familiar territory but still proves itself to be valuable compared to the other material. After the two aforementioned hits, Khaled opens up his own postal service and accepts mail-in verses by the bundle. Mary J. Blige, Fabolous and Jadakiss lazily breeze through Schoolly D’s time-tested “P.S.K.” sample on “It Ain’t Over Til It’s Over” adjacent to “A Million Lights,” where nearly all of Cash Money’s second-stringers force battle rhymes over The Runners’ disco beat.

Meanwhile across the hall in Studio B, Blood, Sweat and Tears sheds some light on a personality that’s been basically hidden since its inception. 2008’s Gutta and 2009’s Ruthless were panned commercially and critically, and if Ace’s third symphony has any distinction from the two, it’s that it features his first signature record–one that will forever be associated in his PR account with “Hustle Hard.” Packing the aural force of 1,000 church bells smashing against a loudspeaker, Ace practically marries Lex Luger’s lively bassline, employing a digestible chopped up flow and dropping memorable fodder: “Same old shit/just a different day/out here trying to get it/each and every way.” Trumped only by its remix, powered by Rick Ross and Lil Wayne, it’s the kind of record everyone knew Ace had up his sleeve from the beginning.

Around The Web

Featured

Stand-Up Comedy Scared The Hell Out Of Me, So I Decided To Give It A Shot

W. Kamau Bell On Joking With The KKK For CNN And Quoting Malcolm X In His New Special

Chef Jonathan Bennett Shares His Fourteen ‘Can’t Miss’ Food Experiences In Cleveland, Ohio

Jen Kirkman Talking About Her New Book Will Make You Want To Write Your Own

Your Travel Guide To Every ‘Archer’ Location On The Planet

Drifters Take Note: This Couple Has Crucial Advice For Long-Term Travelers

By: 04.27.16

‘Rad’ Star Bill Allen Looks Back On Helltrack And That Iconic BMX Prom Scene, 30 Years Later

Key And Peele Talk About ‘Keanu,’ Why Cats Are Funny, And What They’ll Do If Fame Doesn’t Work Out

Meet Christine Sun Kim — The Sound Artist Who’s Changing The Way We Listen

Presented By
The All-New Prius

UPROXX 20: Jon Lajoie Wishes He Could Go Back In Time To Buy Netflix Stock, Just Like You

Professional Travelers Share Their Number One Dream Destination

Aisha Tyler On ‘Archer,’ Not Knowing What Boredom Is, And Directing Her First Feature Film