The Evolution Of Mood Muzik

By: 10.27.10  •  45 Comments

It has always been said that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. However in Joe Budden’s case, one’s man personal tribulations have resulted in that same man’s professional growth and a legion of fans’ unabashed acceptance.

The year 2003 was ultimately a gift and a curse for Jersey City’s finest. While his self-titled debut eventually clipped gold status fueled by the hit single “Pump It Up,” that same song would also result in the main detraction for those who were not eager to give his subsequent projects honest listens. Couple that with personal demons, entertainment beefs, relationship conundrums along with a list of other hurdles and Budden’s “mainstream” career appeared over as quickly as it started. Yet, unknown to many at the time – and probably Joe himself – one of the most influential line of mixtapes was in the process of being cultivated.

The Mood Muzik series represented what the title read. There were no industry influenced records, nor was there any intention to cater to certain demographics. It was raw, uncut and, in some cases, disturbingly honest with Joe Budden detailing nearly inch of his life. Coincidentally, the music would manifest into a lyrical therapy session with DJ OnPoint serving as the lone person capable of dealing with Mouse’s mood swings over a sustained period of time. It was almost as if Joey was physically laying on a sofa, illustrating his shortcomings to the world.

Our only obligation was to hear him out.

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