10 Things You Might Not Know About The ‘Frasier’ Series Finale On Its 10th Anniversary

By: 05.13.14  •  36 Comments


In 2004, NBC said adios to two of its most successful sitcoms — in the same two week period. Last week, we did a look back at the Friends finale and today marks the 10 year anniversary that Frasier Crane said “Goodnight, Seattle” for the final time. Kelsey Grammer had played Dr. Crane for 20 years and it was truly the end of an era, not just for him, but for NBC’s reign as the #1 network for sitcoms.

It’s actually kind of amazing that Frasier was as popular as it was. It didn’t have the hot young cast of Friends or spawn the pop culture catchphrases of Seinfeld, and its star was an opera-loving snob. Not exactly a show middle-America can relate to. Still, it put in more seasons than the rest of NBC’s 1990s comedy lineup and won the Emmy for “best comedy” five years in a row.

Here are 10 facts you might not know about Frasier’s final episode.

1. The finale’s title takes its cue from Frasier’s radio show. The title of the two-part finale “Goodnight, Seattle,” is based on Frasier’s signature radio sign-off.

2. The finale also paid tribute to one of the show’s co-creators. The baby of Niles and Daphne is named David, after David Angell, one of the show’s co-creators who was killed in the 9/11 attacks. David Angell’s sister was in the studio audience for the final episode taping.


3. The episode had its own animated title card sequence. In total, there were 21 different animated title sequences throughout Frasier’s run. The series finale is the only episode to feature a rainbow appearing over the Seattle skyline.

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4. Eddie’s understudy was used in the final episodes. The dog that played Eddie was a Jack Russell terrier named Moose, who was with the show for most of the series’ run. When Moose retired from acting, his younger lookalike, Enzo took over.

5. Only one actor outside of the regular cast appeared in both the pilot and final episode. And that man would be, the deliveryman who takes away Martin’s Lazyboy. Actor Cleto Augusto also played the deliveryman who dropped off Martin’s easy chair in the first episode. Outside of the regular cast, he’s the only actor to appear in both episodes.



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