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Report: A Secret Service Agent ‘Tackled’ Chinese Security In A Confrontation Over The Nuclear Football

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In recent months, the Trump administration has increased their dialogue (while floating the idea of nationalizing the 5G network) about China being a major cyber and economic threat against American interests. Just maybe, a new Axios report might shed more light on this animosity, for it seems that Trump’s November Asian tour produced a physical scuffle between John Kelly, a Secret Service agent, and Chinese security … over the nuclear football.

As most are aware, the nuclear football is actually a briefcase that contains the codes for Trump to greenlight a nuclear strike, and it accompanies him everywhere. Axios reveals (via five sources who say they’re “familiar” with the incident) that Team Trump attempted to enter Beijing’s Great Hall of the People, and Chinese security officials halted the U.S. military aide who was carrying the football. Then this happened:

A U.S. official hurried into the adjoining room and told Kelly what was happening. Kelly rushed over and told the U.S. officials to keep walking — “We’re moving in,” he said — and the Americans all started moving.

Then there was a commotion. A Chinese security official grabbed Kelly, and Kelly shoved the man’s hand off of his body. Then a U.S. Secret Service agent grabbed the Chinese security official and tackled him to the ground.

The altercation was said to be a brief one, and U.S. officials have subsequently done their best to avoid a leak. Somehow, they managed to keep things quiet for four months (!), but word was bound to surface. Axios hears that the U.S. fully briefed China on the briefcase before the visit, but either the message didn’t properly circulate to Chinese security officials, or they “decided to mess with the Americans anyway.” Whatever the case, the security detail apologized for the “misunderstanding,” and sadly, it appears that there was no actual tackle performed by Kelly while rescuing the football.

Admit it — you’d like to see that happen, right?

(Via Axios)

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