FilmDrunk

Jessa Rhodes Explains The In And Outs Of Porn Stardom In 2014 (The Adult Film Minute)

Once per month, Dr. Chauntelle Tibbals will be telling us a little bit about what’s going on in adult entertainment and why it should matter to you.

There’s a “good ol’ days” porn performer myth that people occasionally reminisce about – the exclusive contracts, the $100K annual salaries, the only-working-for-one-company thing. This fantasy-archetype has been blown out of proportion time and again, both in hyperbolic fictionalized accounts of real porn stars and in wild statements about net worth from certain… *icons* – le sigh.

In truth, even when something kinda like that good-ol’-days job description did exist, it didn’t exist for the majority of performers. And today, minus a very small handful of women, the “contract girl” is all but gone. But that’s ok! Today’s up-and-coming porn starlet is a hustler of different proportions, a savvy marketer who knows the value of multiple streams of income (yes, yes, multiple streams, we can wait until you finish giggling).

Take for example Jessa Rhodes. Jessa started working as an adult performer in 2012, and today has about 100 credits to her name. Her career is on the rise, but it got me to wondering – how the heck does one do this, especially in 2014? So I asked.

Jessa told me a few things about money, marketing, and what sort of effort she has to put forth on a regular basis.

Shooting

Controlling for the summertime slowdown, Jessa gets booked for an average of ten scenes per month.

For projects like New Sensations’ Second Chances (2014) (link NSFW, obvi) a charming little comedy about romance and redemption, she works, she gets paid a flat rate (different amounts for different types of scenes, but no royalties or anything), and then she’s done. Jessa’s schedule is actually a bit busier lately after a slight pitch some months ago when she decided to self-represent in lieu of having an agent.

Self-Representation vs. Having an Agent

Jessa used to have an agent, but now she doesn’t. An agent acts as a middle-person between performers and producers, helping to coordinate talent on both ends. According to Jessa, agents generally take about 15% per booking as their fee.

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