CBS Sports’ ‘NFL Monday QB’ Wants To Make You A Smarter Football Fan

11.21.18 4 weeks ago

CBS Sports

There’s no position in American sports that’s as talked about, debated, or scrutinized as quarterback in the NFL, given that it’s the most visible position in the most popular sport. This has long been true, but given the pass-happy nature of the league in 2018, the quarterback position has never been more important to a team’s success.

Great quarterback play is at a premium, and there are a finite number of quarterbacks capable of being a true “franchise” player, which is why quarterbacks set records for the biggest contracts in league history seemingly every offseason and teams without quarterbacks go for broke in hopes of landing that guy.

For media networks with NFL shows, talking about quarterback play is a top priority, and in 2012, CBS Sports Network was looking to create a unique NFL studio show that would utilize its resources of analysts, most of whom were former quarterbacks. The result was NFL Monday QB, an hour-long show hosted by Adam Schein, a veteran TV and radio host from New York, that airs at 6:00 p.m. ET on CBS Sports Network each Monday during the season.

Since its inception, the show has featured three of CBS’ top game analysts — currently Steve Beuerlein, Rich Gannon, and Trent Green — along with guests from the network like Boomer Esiason and Phil Simms (the latter previously was a regular). The goal was to create the first NFL studio show that exclusively featured quarterbacks, who could lean on their experiences in the NFL and their work as game analysts on the road each week to provide unique insight into the most talked about position in sports.

The biggest reason NFL Monday QB works is its group of analysts, all of whom are former quarterbacks who found themselves in just about every position imaginable on a football team. Those experiences are part of their bond on the show, as the strength of their analysis is rooted in knowing everything that can happen under center.

“They didn’t have a silver spoon when they came into the NFL, I think that adds to it,” Schein told Uproxx Sports. “They’ve been starters. They’ve been backups. They’ve been Pro Bowlers. They’ve dealt with injuries. They’ve dealt with adversity. They’ve been in championship games. So, I think there’s that wide scope where they can talk about basically anything that happens on a Sunday, based on their own experience, which I think is pretty special and pretty rare.”

On top of their experiences, they’re all on the road in a different city doing games, meaning they’re able to share details they’ve picked up in meetings with players and coaches that maybe didn’t make the broadcast when discussing whatever the leading stories are in the league.

“I think we’ve all got relationships with coaches, and our former teammates who are coaching now, players, GMs, and of course we have the unique opportunity to be out on the road every week, at these facilities, at practice, talking to the coaches, the coordinators, and players” Gannon said. “We get a chance, like last week, I had Denver and Kansas City, we were at practice on Friday. We watched [Chiefs QB Patrick] Mahomes work, we spent 30 minutes with them in a production meeting. I think it gives us a little bit of a different perspective than just a talking head that gets on there after the game, and just starts throwing out stats and things like that.”

Around The Web