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Tucker Carlson Is Getting Dragged On Twitter For Shocking Comments He Once Made About Statutory Rape


Fox News

Rightwing talkbag Tucker Carlson has spent his long career — and he’s far older than his “preppie villain in a National Lampoon’s comedy” vibe suggests — making shocking and some might say terrible comments, always without serious repercussions. That may change. Or it may not, ever. Sunday night Media Matters, the liberal watchdog group, posted old excerpts from a radio show the Fox News staple used to call up. And they’re the kind of comments that tend to end careers, at least in more sane eras.

The recordings hail from between 2006 and 2011, when Carlson used to regularly call into a program entitled Bubba the Love Sponge, a shock jock show that managed to coax out the parts of Carlson’s brain he usually knew better to conceal. Among Carlson’s beliefs? That Warren Jeffs, a cult leader involved in illegal marriages between older men and underage girls, was worth defending, his accusers worth mocking. (Jeffs, incidentally, is now serving a life sentence for child sexual assault.)

Carlson also had choice words for women, among them Martha Stewart’s daughter, who he agreed with the hosts was “c*nty.” He also called Ariana Huffington a “pig,” branded Britney Spears and Paris Hilton as “the biggest whores in America,” and averred that women in general are “extremely primitive” and like to “be quiet” and do what assertive men tell them to do — presumably assertive men like someone who used to wear bowties on the regular.

The response wasn’t kind, but there were those who, well, weren’t surprised to learn Tucker Carlson harbors terrible beliefs.

Others were sure there would be little to no repercussions.

Others pointed out he’s also a hypocrite when it comes to the c-word.

Speaking of Daily Show alumni, others dug up Jon Stewart’s famous appearance on Crossfire in 2004, when it was co-hosted by Carlson.

Right-wing guru Matt Walsh rushed to Tucker’s defense, pointing out that these are old comments after all. Turns out that wasn’t the best argument to make in this case.

Eventually someone else weighed in with some real thoughts: Tucker Carlson himself.

Carlson was unrepentant, reluctant to play the (insincere) apology game. “Media Matters caught me saying something naughty on a radio show more than a decade ago,” Carlson wrote, treating comments in which he defended a sexual predator like routine locker room talk. “Rather than express the usual ritual contrition, how about this: I’m on television every weeknight live for an hour. If you want to know what I think, you can watch. Anyone who disagrees with my views is welcome to come on and explain why.”

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