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You Can Still Register For The Midterm Elections In These 15 States

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If you’re currently pulling out your own hair for somehow forgetting to register to vote for tomorrow’s election, you may be in luck. As of March 2018, 15 states (and Washington D.C.) offer election day registration to qualified residents. That means you can register to vote and cast your ballot on the same day.

Take a look at the map below, compiled by the National Conference of State Legislatures to see if your state offers election day registration.

National Conference of State Legislatures

You will need certain documentation in order to be eligible (the particular rules vary from state to state), but if for some reason you can’t meet the requirements right away you can still cast a provisional ballot until you or your state can sufficiently verify your identity. It should go without saying that in order to register you must do so in person and if you try and commit voter fraud by doubling up your votes, you will be found out and go to jail. It’s a felony.

Take a look at the requirements for the 15 states that offer Election Day registration, and get to the polls!

California

When: 14 days before an election through Election Day.

Where: At County election official offices and other satellite locations.

What you’ll need: You’ll have to vote by provisional ballot which will only be counted once county election officials check the statewide voter registration database and confirm you haven’t registered or voted elsewhere.

Colorado

When: From early voting periods through Election Day.

Where: Statewide vote centers. It should be noted that if you do this out of the county you live in, you’ll only be able to vote in statewide races.

What you’ll need: Colorado driver’s license or an ID card issued by the Department of Revenue, as well as a self-affirmation and a signed affidavit.

Connecticut

When: Election Day

Where: Designated locations in each town.

What you’ll need: Proof of identity and residency, you must also declare under oath that you have not already voted.

Washington D.C.

When: 30 days prior to and on Election Day, the voter can only vote on Election Day.

Where: Any voting location during the early voting period, or your precinct polling place on Election Day.

What you’ll need: Applicant must make an oath and provide proof of residence. Valid IDs include: Government issued ID, a copy of current utility bill, bank statement, government check, or a paycheck. If you can’t provide proof of residency, you will be given a provisional ballot.

Hawaii

When: Early voting period through Election Day.

Where: Precinct polling places or absentee polling places as established by the county you live in.

What you’ll need: Hawaii driver’s license, state-issued ID, or the last four digits of your social security number. Applicant must make a sworn affirmation that they have not yet voted, but are qualified.

Idaho

When: Election Day.

Where: Your local precinct polling place.

What you’ll need: Two forms of identification with at least one showing your current address. These include: driver’s license, university or college ID, current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check, or any government document with name and address.

Iowa

When: Absentee period through Election Day.

Where: At the county auditor’s office or at satellite voting locations during in-person absentee periods. Registration will be handled at your local precinct polling place on Election Day.

What you’ll need: Voters must show a current photo ID as well as proof of residency. You must also complete a written oath.

Maine

When: Election Day.

Where: At your local precinct polling place.

What You’ll need: With proof of identity and residency you’re all good. If you can’t provide satisfactory proof you’ll have to vote provisionally until your identity can be confirmed.

Minnesota

When: Election Day.

Where: Your local precinct polling place, county offices, and in-person absentee voting centers.

What you’ll need: Proof of residence.

Montana

When: 30 days before an election through Election Day.

Where: County election office.

What you’ll need: Local election officials will verify your signature and identity.

New Hampshire

When: Election Day.

Where: Your local town or city ward.

What you’ll need: ID and proof of residency will score you a ballot. If you have insufficient photo-identification, you can get your picture taken and sign an affidavit.

Utah

When: Early voting period through Election Day.

Where: Early voting locations and polling places.

What you’ll need: Valid ID and proof of residency will score you a provisional ballot.

Vermont

When: Anytime.

Where: Town or city clerk’s office before the election. Precinct polling places on Election Day.

What you’ll need: Vermont will conduct a post-election audit if voter rolls show you registered and voted in multiple towns.

Wisconsin

When: Election Day.

Where: Precinct polling place where you live.

What you’ll need: Proof of residency and a valid ID.

Wyoming

When: Election Day.

Where: Polling places, vote centers, and other locations as designated by the county clerk.

What you’ll need: Proof of residency and identification. If you cannot provide sufficient proof, you will be given a provisional ballot.

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