8-Bit Oversights: Games That Should Have Been Included In The New Mini NES Classic Edition

07.14.16 1 year ago 23 Comments
gammasquadnesmini

Nintendo/Microsoft/Disney/Capcom

This morning, Nintendo once again zigged when everybody expected them to zag, announcing the new NES Classic Edition, an adorable mini replica of the NES that comes with 30 8-bit classics pre-installed. It’s a surprising move, since these kind of all-in-one machines are usually the domain of sketchy kiosks in the mall, but it does look like a solid way for casual gamers to get their classic gaming fix. Expect the NES Classic Edition to be a popular stocking stuffer this Christmas.

It helps that the machine’s lineup of games is pretty solid – Mario, Zelda, Mega Man and Castlevania are all accounted for (you can check out the full list here). That said, there are also a few curious oversights. Here are 10 more classics Nintendo really ought to add to the NES Classic Edition’s lineup.

Note: This list doesn’t include any NES sports games, since they were already covered thoroughly here.

Contra

Oddly, the NES Classic includes Super C, but not the original Contra. Super C has its charms, but Contra is definitely the true classic, and all-round better game. I mean, how can you leave out the game that popularized the Konami code?

Earthbound Beginnings

The NES game that kicked off the cult-classic Earthbound series went unreleased in the West for a quarter century until Nintendo unexpectedly released a fully-translated version on the Wii U last year. Unlike most of the games on this list, Earthbound Beginnings would be a totally fresh experience for most people picking up the NES Classic, and serve as a great introduction to an underappreciated series.

Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse

So, the NES Classic includes both Castlevania and Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest, which is a somewhat questionable choice. Castlevania II breaks with 8-bit Castlevania tradition and is considered a bit of a black sheep, while the Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse is a much more traditional (and entertaining) adventure. If Castlevania II makes the cut, then Castlevania III should, too.

Around The Web