TV

‘Flight Of The Conchords’ Videos To Guide You Through The Sea Of Love

It’s been eight years since Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement’s New Zealand-bred act, Flight of the Conchords, stepped into the mainstream with the debut of their eponymous comedy series on HBO (which is available for streaming on HBO Now). The duo has only grown in notoriety during that time, despite the show’s short lifespan of just two seasons. Why? The cleverness of their material, the immortality bestowed upon their bite-sized musical comedy bits by YouTube, and the ever-relevant nature of their primary topics, love and sex.

Here now is a look at some of their best takes on matters of the heart and the sugar lumps

Getting Noticed: Sugar Lumps

In the show, Jemaine and Bret portrayed themselves as an unsuccessful band who couldn’t get laid and couldn’t get regular gigs. The truth is, however, that the two were low-level comedy sex symbols at the time, so it’s not surprising that they penned this ode to getting stared at in a carnal way whenever they wore “dungarees” that made people “hungry.”
Making Your Move: The Most Beautiful Girl (In The Room)

If you’ve ever heard, fielded, or maybe even attempted a truly awful pick-up line, this song featuring mostly well-meaning, but clumsy compliments and comped kebabs is all for you.
The Start Of Something: Carol Brown 

Un-crude and slightly sweet, this soft song about Jemaine’s past romantic failings and his hope for a new relationship speaks to the power of newness to make us think we can change.

Being Honest: I Told You I Was Freaky

Honesty is the best policy, even when you’re as freaky as Bret.

Making Plans For The Future: Business Time

Hopefully your future plans will involve a bit more magic than Jemaine’s daydream about lazy and quick missionary sex with a bored partner.

Love Lost: I’m Not Crying

If you get let go, let it out. Nobody believes that you’re making a lasagna… for one.

Wishing They’d Come Back: Leggy Blonde

Rhys Darby stole a lot of scenes as the band’s manager Murray, but rarely ever musically, as he does in this clip when he takes center stage while singing about the obvious lost love of his life.

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