An Abridged Guide To 20 Classic Movies Celebrating Big Anniversaries In 2014

By: 02.27.14  •  18 Comments
forest-gump lead

Words By Dr. Hip HopJust like people and rap albums, films also have anniversaries. And in 2014 there are a ton of groundbreaking and memorable films that are celebrating some pretty important anniversaries of their initial theatrical release.

Some of those films are still teenagers, kicking at 15 and still pretty fresh in our collective consciousness. Others are either entering or half way done with their twenties, but still feel as fresh as ever. And then there are those that, like myself, are entering the real grown up years of their lives. But unlike me, these film classics still got a lot of life left in them.

So let’s take a trip down memory lane and look at ten films, released over the course of 30 years, that will be celebrating a birthday this year. In the words of the great Kanye West, “I’d like to propose a toast. I said toast mutha******s!”

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Soul Plane

Soul Plane

Released: May 28, 2004 (10 Years)

Alright, something positive to say… Well the movie was Kevin Hart’s first major starring role. So without this film movie fans would probably not see him currently dominating the cineplex with the “interesting” (read: mediocre) Ride Along. Take that how you will.

White-Chicks

White Chicks

Released: June 23, 2004 (10 Years)

I’m sure somebody out there likes this film 2004 vehicle for Shawn and Marlon Wayans to live out all the “best” white woman stereotypes. And so for them I show love for this decade old film. The gender-bender showed us all the power of Vanessa Carlton and made Terry Crews look incredibly creepy. Incidentally, the film also seemed to mark the end of Shawn Wayans’ career (I mean has he been in anything big after that? And don’t you dare say Little Man!).

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Matrix

The Matrix

Released: March 31, 1999 (15 Years)

It revolutionized the action film genre for the new millennium and gave dance choreographers a new move to expand their repertoire. To say The Matrix wasn’t a groundbreaking film is akin to suggesting that Rakim didn’t change the rap game. There were “smart” action films before The Matrix, but none of them became as popular within the zeitgeist as this Warner Bros./Wachowski Bros. smash.

iron giant

The Iron Giant

Released: July 31, 1999 (15 Years)

You probably know the director of this animated film, Brad Bird, as the guy behind Pixar’s The Incredibles (AWESOME) and 2011’s Mission Impossible-Ghost Protocol (ALSO AWESOME). In 1999 he helped bring to life this sleeper animated hit that was as heart-wrenching as any live action drama and fun as any of Disney’s best. Hell, I’ll admit it: a young thug shed a few tears at the climax. Don’t judge.

fight club

Fight Club

Released: Oct. 15, 1999 (15 Years)

Fight Club featured Brad Pitt and Edward Norton in rare form, David Fincher at his directing best, and in many ways the culmination of the ‘90s postmodern world. It was a film with many interpretations, but I think one broad understanding is that it documented the maturation of Generation X.

Ed. Note: Also a phenomenal book by Chuck Palahniuk, as deranged an author as modern literature has today.

The Best Man

The Best Man

Released: Oct. 22, 1999 (15 Years)

Yes, we got a pretty good sequel to the film last year, but it’s always important to show appreciation to the original. The cast was a who’s who of popular African American actors and actresses at the time (and a few who would blow up even more) and the story of friendship, love, and betrayal was as universal as a Shakespeare play. Even after 15 years, the movie still stands as a great.

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Crooklyn

Crooklyn

Released: May 13, 1994 (20 Years)

There are a lot of great Spike Lee joints, but none of them have as much heart as the family drama/coming-of-age film Crooklyn. Sort of based on Lee’s life, the film balanced humor with heartfelt drama. It told a specific story that still spoke to the African-American condition, and for that we’ll always be grateful.

speed

Speed

Released: June 10, 1994 (20 Years)

Before he helmed one of the biggest films of all time, Joss Whedon wrote a script for a film that featured “The One” (a.k.a. Keanu Reeves) going against a beautifully insane Dennis Hopper. Speed was a top-notch action film and left a mark on pop culture (who hasn’t reenacted the bus speeding scene at least once while driving?). Bonus: it featured a spunky and kind of-cute Sandra Bullock before she blew up.

lion king

The Lion King

Released: June 15, 1994 (20 Years)

The Lion King’s impact on the lives of children (and adults) of the ‘90s is indelible. A kid’s version of a Shakespearean play, this box office-smashing animated film helped propel Disney into the stratosphere and explained to the world what the hell a meerkat was.

forest gump

Forrest Gump

Released: July 6, 1994 (20 Years)

“Life is like a box of chocolates.” Very few lines in modern cinema are as famous as those uttered by Tom Hanks as the title character in this 1994 critical darling and blockbuster smash. Hanks’ performance endeared millions to Mr. Gump and touched all our hearts in the process.

pulp fiction

Pulp Fiction

Released: Sept. 23, 1994 (20 Years)

1994 was a year full of groundbreaking films and Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction might have led the pack. A film as irreverent as humanly possible, Pulp Fiction revived careers, made stars of newcomers, and encapsulated the post-modern film stylings of the ‘90s.

Hoop Dreams

Hoop Dreams

Released: Oct. 14, 1994 (20 Years)

While we could argue about the greater social and political activist side of NBA players today, flimmakers showcased the sport of basketball in several ’90s films. One of them that created a lasting impact is the critically acclaimed documentary centered in Chicago, Hoop Dreams. What it lacked in all-star soundtrack and energy (see: 1994’s Above the Rim), it made up in honesty, soul, and zero pulled punches. We probably wouldn’t have the great ESPN 30 for 30 series without this film.

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