How A Smartwatch Can Help You Keep Your New Year’s Health Resolutions

Features Writer
01.02.18 3 Comments

Uproxx

Now that the world over has officially ushered in 2018, it’s time to make your bold new resolutions for the year ahead. New body! New attitude! New you! Knowing, of course, that they’re all sure to come undone by the end of January.

We humans have been prone to breaking resolutions for as long as we’ve been making them, but the new era of tech is helping us in the Sisyphean quest to actually do what we say. For those who fully intend to take on the New Year with a renewed approach to health, technology is on your side. Or, more accurately, on your wrist.

As we continue forward in an era where technology is poised to become the medicine of the future, here’s a look at how your smartwatch can help you keep those resolutions well into the new year and beyond.

Getting In Shape

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Becoming more active is one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions every year, and while it can be a challenge to stay up to task, step trackers (or pedometers, if you want to get technical) are one of the easiest ways to do so. Having been around in some form since the 15th century, the first modern-day version mass-marketed in 1985, based on the idea that 10,000 steps was the number to hit each day for optimal health. Now, peds are found on virtually every piece of wearable tech — from the most basic Fitbit to the latest generation of smartwatch. The best part is they work automatically, so as long as you’re wearing the device, it will keep track of your movement.

When you start seeing the number of steps you take each day (or lack thereof) the smartwatch pedometer seems to have an innate ability to get you moving. Whereas I used to assume my two daily walks around the neighborhood with my dogs was enough, seeing that it only added up to about 7,000 steps made me realize I simply wasn’t moving as much as I wanted. By setting a daily step goal, your smartwatch will gently nudge you to get up and walk via occasional push alerts. It’s so gently persistent that it can even prompt you out into adverse weather to make sure that your daily goal is met.

Granted, getting (and staying) active shouldn’t be limited to keeping track of your daily steps. For those wanting to expand their fitness routine, the two main options are Google Fit and Apple Health — for the Android and iOS platforms, respectively. They both work in conjunction with multiple fitness apps to track your exercise duration, the calories you burned, and your average heart rate. They can even access your medical records remotely to help paint a broader picture of your health, which can also do wonders for your motivation.

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