Culture

Chris Christie Is Reportedly Now Trump’s Manservant Who Fetches McDonald’s For Him

Donald Trump Holds Super Tuesday Election Night Press Conf. In Palm Beach
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As we inch ever closer to the Republican National Convention in July, at which time Donald Trump will be formally named at the party’s official presidential candidate, Republicans are still grappling as to how to deal with having to decide whether or not to accept the polarizing candidate. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan finally broke down and endorsed Trump only to immediately regret it, while other members of the party are left with their tails between their legs.

This is the subject of a piece coming out in the New Yorker‘s June 20 issue called “Occupied Territory,” which explores how the Republican elite are struggling over whether to continue to resist Trump or surrender to him. While Ryan and his ilk have been put in an uncomfortable position, others like Marco Rubio haven’t been able to suck up fast enough.

Of course, no member of the Republican party has sucked it up to Trump quite like New Jersey governor Chris Christie, who — despite continued abuse and humiliation at the hands of the former Apprentice star — is happy to do his bidding. Such was this stand-out excerpt from the New Yorker piece that portrays Christie as… well, Trump’s b*tch, basically.

Governor Chris Christie, of New Jersey, another of Trump’s opponents early in the campaign, has transformed himself into a sort of manservant, who is constantly with Trump at events. (One Republican told me that a friend of his on the Trump campaign used Snapchat to send him a video of Christie fetching Trump’s McDonald’s order.)

Fetching McDonald’s. Has it really come to this, Christie? The sad thing is that while obviously Christie is gunning for that sweet VP spot on Trump’s ticket, the likelihood of Trump actually giving it to him unless literally no one else is willing to take it is slim. There’s a reason why Selina Meyer on Veep didn’t choose Gary as her running mate.

(New Yorker via Ruth Graham)

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