How Bonnaroo’s Emphasis On Inclusion And Community Made It A Beloved Music Festival

Pop Music Critic
05.29.19

Courtesy of Bonnaroo

Since its inception in 2002, Bonnaroo has become a beacon in the festival world. Across almost two decades, the eighteen-year-old festival has created a benchmark other events look to, allowing festival-goers to return again and again. The fest has always nodded to historic predecessors like the late-’90s Phish fests — and Phish is even headlining this year for two sets — the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, and of course, Woodstock. Efforts to revive that epic first-festival event this year, along with the recent debacle that is Fyre Fest, revealed that producing a successful event of this scale is perhaps much harder than it seems.

Yet, Bonnaroo continues to execute the feat with the kind of loyalty-inducing excellence that most production companies crave, and one of their secrets lies in emphasizing the many different subgroups the festival attracts. For those unfamiliar with the set up on The Farm — or the sprawling, 650-acre grounds dubbed Great Stage Park in Manchester, Tennessee — all that wide open space makes the venue an ideal setting for camping during the fest. But, if you’ve ever camped or attended a large scale event, you’re probably aware that different people want very different things out of an experience like this. Sophie Lobl, part of the booking team at C3 who helps throw the festival every year, thinks a huge part of the environment at Bonnaroo is due to a returning audience, and one that is focused on positivity.

“Bonnaroo is an extremely tight festival in terms of the audience we get, probably due to the location, and a little bit due to the history,” Lobl told Uproxx. “It’s just a super, super tight audience. And we pride ourselves on being an inclusive place. Everyone feels like they have somewhere they can feel safe, or else have a really great time. The festival’s message is to radiate positivity, obviously. It’s what we strive to achieve.”

As one of the earliest festivals to help set the trend in America, ‘Roo — as it’s affectionately come to be called — set itself apart in a couple of different ways. Firstly, it established a festival site early on that attendees would return to each year, and relics from this venue, like the beloved arch that was destroyed in a controlled fire this week — helped create traditions and establish the mood and vibe of the campgrounds, which end up influencing the tone of the event just as much as the programming does.

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