Neil Young Onstage Alone, On A Journey Through The Past

Senior Music Writer
07.05.18

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Listen To This Eddie is a weekly column that examines the important people and events in the classic rock canon and how they continue to impact the world of popular music.

A euphoric blast of applause greeted the solitary figure as he ambled out from the shadows and took a seat at the center of stage. He looked to his left and to his right, then reached for one of the acoustic guitars arranged in a circle around him. Silence; a silence brimming with reverence, fell over the 4,000 people arranged in seats in the ornate, gilded theater before him as he tested the strings. The cracking of a beer can 40 rows back sounded like an explosion in this heady, anticipatory atmosphere. Then he reached back, way, way back into his past — 50 full years — and began to sing. “When the dream came / I held my breath with my eyes closed,” he crooned; his voice, that lilting, high falsetto graced with all the sadness of the ages, totally unaffected by time.

Neil Young opened his second solo show at the Auditorium Theater in Chicago with one of his earliest compositions, a song titled “On The Way Home,” that he wrote in 1967 while still a member of the group Buffalo Springfield. It was an unexpected choice to say the least — though, when it comes to Neil Young, unexpected is standard operating procedure — but it might have been perfect. This particular gig was the third in a series of six, totally solo concerts Neil had booked in 2018 and it appears he’s been using them to embark on his own journey through the past, plumbing the depths of his own personal history through some of his favorite songs.

For the pair of Chicago concerts, he hardly could have chosen a more apt location. This venue happened to be the site of the first-ever Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young live show. The supergroup performed here back in August of 1969 as a sort of warm-up before they hit the bigger stage for a festival in upstate New York called Woodstock. “There’s two things I remember most,” Graham Nash recently told me about that gig. “First of all, we couldn’t get the truck into the back-end of the theater. Our truck driver, Jimmy DeLuca… deflated the tires on an 18-wheeler and depressed the tire pressure enough that it lowered it the four-inches he needed to get the truck in there. The second thing I remember, and more importantly, is that we had the balls to ask Joni Mitchell to open for us. Are you f*cking kidding me?”

Neil, with his off-kilter sense of humor — he’s far funnier than his dour façade would lead you to believe — also noted the historical significance of the building during the show. “I first played here on 1969,” he said. “It was CSNY’s first gig. I wasn’t even born yet. Probably why I don’t remember it.” Though he pretended his memory was shoddy, he carried reminders of that band and that era with him onstage in the form of two acoustic guitars that he revealed were “Given to me by my good friend Stephen Stills.”

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