Viral

Tucker Carlson Talks To A ‘Brave’ College Student Who Had His Face Photoshopped Onto A Cracker

Ever the bastion of important journalism, on Wednesday evening Tucker Carlson spoke with Ryan Wolfe, a Wake Forest University college student, for a long overdue Fox News segment on tolerance and diversity. Prior to the 2016 election, Wolfe participated in a panel discussion hosted by Wake Forest’s Republican groups, which resulted in some online bullying.

“Before, during, and after this event there were messages about me on social media, in group chats that were kind of trying to intimidate me,” Wolfe explained. “And then after the event, I was handed a box of saltine crackers, and in a group chat during the event a student photoshopped my face onto a cracker.”

“I assume that’s a slur against your ethnicity, correct?” Carlson interjected, to which Wolfe replied, “Yes, that’s how it was intended, absolutely.”

Wolfe then went on to point out that his school has very strict harassment rules, and despite the fact that he obviously stands by the First Amendment, his fellow students were clearly in violation of said rules. “But we are trying to hold all students to the same standard, so I reported the conduct,” he continued.

After several weeks went by however, he was informed that President Trump’s election “somehow justified their behavior,” even though the incident in question happened before election day.

“If you were a different kind of person, this would have been punished, I assume?” Carlson asked, with all the ambiguity of the nose on his face. “Right, exactly,” Wolfe replied, explaining how a student who had used a racial slur around the same time had been asked to leave school two days later.

“Ryan, I really appreciate how brave you are to come on, and how clearly you expressed that,” Tucker said to the kid whose face was Photoshopped onto a saltine cracker, closing out the segment. “And in a way you’re a credit to Wake Forest, because you’re impressive. But the school is obviously not living up to its own standards.”

(Via Mediaite)

Around The Web

×