Talking To Akiva Schaffer And Scott Aukerman About Michael Bolton And Valentine’s Day Is An Adventure

02.14.17 9 months ago

Netflix

Last week, Netflix belatedly gifted its more amorous “Netflix and chill” viewers the ultimate Christmas present — Michael Bolton’s Big, Sexy Valentine’s Day Special. A spiritual sequel of sorts to The Lonely Island’s mockumentary Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping, the faux variety program gives a platform to the titular crooner’s “Jack Sparrow” characterization of himself: an obsessed cinephile whose dedication to the craft of lovemaking is surpassed only by his sultry songs. Yet as self-deprecating as this parody is, Bolton’s performance remains remarkable throughout.

Much of this has to do with the star’s willingness to make fun of his career — something the Grammy-winner hasn’t always been too keen on. However, co-directors Akiva Schaffer (The Lonely Island) and Scott Aukerman (Comedy Bang! Bang!), deserve just as much credit. This isn’t the first project Schaffer and Aukerman have worked on together. They first teamed up as writers for the 2009 MTV Movie Awards, hosted by Schaffer’s fellow Lonely Island-er Andy Samberg.

“We worked on the 2009 MTV Movie Awards, a few Comedy Bang! Bang! episodes, and the Emmys,” Schaffer says of his collaborator. “Scott was head writer and wrote all of Andy Samberg’s stuff. He put together the writers’ room and saw it through, too. So after me and Michael came up with just the basic idea — basically the title of the thing — I didn’t think I could handle it alone.”

“I’ve always had an interest in directing and the cinema,” says Aukerman, to which his co-director responds “oh boy.” Asked about how and when Schaffer reached out to him, the former Comedy Bang! Bang! host offers the first of many silly answers: “Now, cut to — as they say in the ‘biz’ — Akiva Schaffer, 30s, scruffy, and with a wry sensibility. He falls to one knee, pleading. He says, ‘Scott, I can’t do it without you. I tried man, but I can’t do this. This is too much for me to handle. Please save me!’ I accept and the rest is Netflix history.”

“That should have been the first couple of minutes, seeing how it all came together from behind the scenes,” says Schaffer when asked why Aukerman’s humorous account wasn’t included. After all, the impromptu sketch did involve his going down on bended knee. It would have fit right in among Bolton’s romantic escapades. “More movies should start with how they came together,” adds Aukerman. “They should start with a 10-minute documentary about how the movie came about. Then I’d be invested.”

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