A Look Behind The Morality And Horror Of ‘Judge Judy’ And Reality Court TV

01.16.16 11 months ago 13 Comments
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There’s no denying that Judge Judy has tackled several tough cases throughout her lifetime, especially before she became one of the most recognizable faces on television. She spent years fighting battles in family court as a prosecutor and soon became a judge that became known for the personality we now see on TV. The difference now is that it’s all for entertainment.

As most know, Judge Judy and shows like it specialize in small claims arbitration, where the parties involved in the case agree to drop their court cases and take them to the show for a solution. It’s where the misery of life comes out and is forced to play for the joy of the viewing audience. Just take reality TV producer Sharon Houston for example. She explains her job in a very interesting piece from AOL, where she also explains the process behind finding folks to be on the show:

For example, if you’re from Detroit, Houston, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Kansas City, New Orleans, Indianapolis, Chicago, Milwaukee, Gary, or Atlanta, I’m calling you no matter what the case is about. Why? Because that’s where crazy lives. I’m also going to call you if you’re suing for pain and suffering, mental distress, mental agony, nightmares, and my favorite, loss of enjoyment of life. I also love it when Plaintiff wants to sue Defendant for being “triflin’.” That’s good stuff!

Here’s where the job gets really stressful: We have to make sure litigants get on their flight to L.A. A lot of great cases don’t happen because the litigants are afraid to fly. Many times litigants have told me, “Jesus told me not to get on the plane.” One lady I tried to book said, “If Jesus wanted me to fly he’d have made me a parakeet, a mosquito, a butterfly, a bat” and so on. I interrupted her list of things that can fly by noting the fact that Jesus rose from the dead so technically, he was the first to fly and would want her to fly, too. Didn’t work.

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