Kamasi Washington’s ‘Harmony Of Difference’ Has The Potential To Change How The World Sees Jazz

Hip-Hop Editor
10.05.17

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Normally, when you get a song stuck in your head, it’s due to a catchy melody or a hooky pop chorus that just worms its way into the back of your brain, popping up every few minutes so that you catch yourself humming a few bars or muttering the handful of lyrics that you can remember ad nauseum for as many days as it takes hold. Sometimes you love it — okay, most times, but you pretend to hate it, because that’s what we do in the era of social media-encouraged snark. But what do you do when an artist’s whole album is that one line, that four bars of music, or simply a wordless aria that inhabits your spirit?

That’s the question I’ve been grappling with over the brassy through-line of Harmony Of Difference the engaging, daring new suite from jazz revivalist Kamasi Washington, which, to be clear, is only the best problem to have. You hear it in the first song, “Desire” as a typically “jazzy” blend of piano and horns, low-tempo, swaying softly in a smoky lounge. By the sixth and final track, “Truth,” it has metamorphosed into a swooping, heroic blast of adventure movie music, soaring choral vocals have been added, the tempo has picked up, and Washington has lost all pretense of restraint, tearing into his saxophone solo like a starved tiger after a haunch of lamb.

Jazz has always been my thing, but it’s odd to say after twenty-some years of listening to the likes of Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Thelonius Monk, John Coltrane, Quincy Jones, and Grover Washington Jr., I have never heard anything like Harmony Of Difference. It’s evocative in a way that none of my previous favorites have ever been. Jazz, for me, was always background music in a way — throw it on, set a mood, commence to whatever activity prompted the evening’s selection and just vibe out.

Sure, there’s an appreciation of the technicality, musicianship, and at times, virtuoso involved in the composition, arrangement, and especially the improvisation involved. There’s a complex calculus that goes into every musical decision, but it’s never been my interest to try and dissect the reasoning behind them. I’ve been entertained, but in a sort of disengaged way that allows me to set my internal autopilot to a task without being distracted.

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