10 Things We Learned From Last Night’s Nostril-Flaring ‘Sons Of Anarchy’

By: 11.28.12  •  245 Comments

The thing about this week’s episode of Sons of Anarchy is that, for the first time, we’re getting a very good idea of where the show is heading toward next season, and you know what? I really like the end game here, I’m just having some issues with how Kurt Sutter is getting to that point. Let’s hop right into the recap, and discuss along the way.

1. “Today I will be the man my father tried to be. I will make you proud.” — I really hate it when Sutter opens an episode with Jax’s voice overs. Their is no action on screen to obfuscate how hopelessly heavy-handed Kurt Sutter’s writing can sometimes be. He doesn’t do any favors to his characters with those voice overs.

2. Clay’s Life Is Spared. Again — At least, temporarily, as Bobby’s big plan to save Clay’s life was to convince him to confess to the home invasions, thus rendering Jax’s season-long search for PROOF completely moot. Clay brought it to the table, confessed his sins, and SAMCRO stripped him of his patch.

However, Bobby was the one vote that kept Clay from meeting Mr. Mayhem. DAMNIT BOBBY. At least this scenario is somewhat believable, and Bobby pulls the deal for the good of the club, to prevent Jax from becoming the man he wants to kill.

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3. “The Right Thing Settles It.” Jax was not pleased with Bobby’s play. Jax responds to Bobby’s concerns over the direction that Jax is headed with a heavy-handed YOU NEED ME ON THAT WALL speech. “Opie was right. You can’t sit in this chair without being a savage.” What Bobby really meant to say was, “It’s the right move because it keeps Clay around another season.” And you know what? Mark Boone Junior has such a heartfelt voice of reason that, if he had actually said, “Well, Kurt asked me to vote Nay so we didn’t have to kill Clay off this season,” I’d have totally been all right with that. By the end of the episode, I’m not sure that Jax didn’t want Bobby dead, too. “If I get you alone, I’m gonna tear your goddamn head off.” NOSTRIL FLARE.

4. But Jax Still Wants Clay Dead — I still think that Damon Pope has been sorely underused this season, and I’m still troubled by how much Jax looks up to the guy that killed his best friend, but BYGONES. Jax turned to Pope to get advice on his Clay situation, and Pope gives it to him: “Democracy is overrated. Revenge is never about the greater good. It’s a visceral need that has to be satisfied or the strong loses focus.” I’m pretty sure that Sutter stole that line from a Bruce Lee film. Point is, Jax is not letting it go.

5. Tig’s Time Is Up — Damon Pope gives Jax a friendly reminder that he needs Tig delivered to him because, oh I dunno, killing Opie and Tig’s daughter wasn’t revenge enough for the murder of Pope’s own daughter. He also needs to kill Tig — IT’S A VISCERAL NEED — although he specifically said in the first episode of the season that killing Tig would be letting him off too easy. Will Tig actually die in next week’s episode? I mean, someone major HAS to die, but there aren’t enough SAMCRO members left to kill anymore at this point.

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