Viral

J.K. Rowling Has Sparked A Backlash By Defending a Woman Who Was Fired For Transphobic Remarks

In a landmark ruling on Thursday, a London employment tribunal upheld the firing of a woman who had been let go from her job for blasting government plans to allow transgender people to self-identify on Twitter. The decision instantly became a subject of debate in the UK, and author J.K. Rowling has put herself firmly on the controversial side of it.

Maya Forstater, 45, had been employed at a London-based think-tank that campaigns against poverty when she was accused of using “offensive and exclusionary” language in a series of tweets in which she claimed that “men cannot change into women.” She was subsequently terminated from her job. Forstater then went on to sue to former employers alleging that her so-called “gender-critical” view (that there are only two biological sexes) was a protected philosophical belief under the 2010 Equality Act.

In short, had Forstater won her ruling, employers in the UK would have been legally prevented from dismissing employees who express discriminatory views on LGBTQ rights.

If you think it seems like a good thing that homophobic or transphobic remarks will continue to not be tolerated in the workplace, you’re not alone. However, the Harry Potter author apparently does not agree. In the wake of the ruling, the typically left-leaning Ms. Rowling blasted out a tweet in support of Forstater, and now, she’s being accused of being a TERF (trans-exclusionary radical feminist) in doing so.

“Dress however you please. Call yourself whatever you like. Sleep with any consenting adult who’ll have you. Live your best life in peace and security,” she wrote. “But force women out of their jobs for stating that sex is real? #IStandWithMaya #ThisIsNotADrill”

Her tweet, uh, was received accordingly.

And there was also a bit of “told ya so” from the trans community:

As devastating as this all is to Rowling’s reputation, perhaps this is the most savage knife twist of them all:

Around The Web

×