‘Child’s Play’ Is Funny And Gory But Misses A Golden Opportunity To Be Relevant

06.21.19 4 weeks ago

To its credit, MGM’s new Child’s Play reboot manages to justify its relevance to 2019 in about 10 seconds. It opens with a Robocop-style† direct address commercial starring Tim Matheson for the Buddi Doll, from the Kaslan Corporation (reminiscent of Robocop’s Omni consumer products). Buddi is essentially an anthropomorphized Alexa, who can not only control all your internet-connected Kaslan products but also give small hugs and sing songs about friendship. The doll, largely constructed out of practical effects with computer animated facial expressions, is also nicely creepy.

Connect a scary doll to the internet and suddenly there are all sorts of contemporary satire opportunities. If “why does the doll kill?” is the big question, “because he was connected to the internet” is an answer most people in 2019 could easily believe. The news is full of spree killers and extremists whose madness has almost certainly been exacerbated by algorithms that prioritize extreme content and tailored news items that fan their previously-held prejudices. It’s not a big leap from Roman sword-wielding martyrs of the incel-net to killer Alexas.

Yet after so promisingly setting itself up for contemporary relevance (no easy feat!), Child’s Play clearly, definitively decides to exist not in contemporary society but in schlocky movie world. You can trace it back to a single scene.

Early on, we discover that a disgruntled Vietnamese toy designer has, as a last F-you to his employer, disabled all the safety protocols on his last Buddi doll (including setting the “violence inhibitor” to “off,” which is pretty funny). The doll eventually finds its way to the unnamed American city where most of Child’s Play is set (blighted, urban, vaguely East Coast-y), where it’s returned as defective to the Marshalls-esque discount store where Karen, played by Aubrey Plaza, works.

Overworked single mom Karen gifts it to her preteen son, Andy (Gabriel Bateman), to whom defective Buddi becomes Andy’s first friend in their new town, despite his glitches (when Andy names him “Han Solo,” Buddi hears “Chucky,” among other things). When the other kids in Andy’s apartment complex realize Andy’s Buddi doll can use swear words and do other usually-prohibited things, Andy starts making real friends. While Child’s Play, directed by Lars Klevberg and written by Tyler Burton Smith, is usually pretty spot-on in its depiction of what entertains shithead 13-year-olds, one of their first acts together is watching The Texas Chainsaw Massacre on TV as a group. This is the scene in question.

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