Isabelle Huppert Is Fantastic As A Psychopathic Friend Who’s Too Much To Handle In The Puzzling ‘Greta’

Senior Editor
03.05.19

Focus Features

 

There’s something to Greta, though it’s an open question whether the filmmakers know it.

I used to have an old man at my local coffee shop who would blather on and on, trying to trap every customer in conversation. It was clear that he was just desperately lonely, and if this had been a movie, “sweet old man could use a friend” would’ve been the beginning of a beautiful relationship, where I’d push him down the street in his wheelchair on a fabulously sunny day, we’d both learn valuable lessons and blah blah blah. I would tell myself that I should just talk to him for a bit and relieve his loneliness, but I was afraid of getting trapped. So instead I avoided him like he had the plague.

It’s a curious facet of human nature that our inner altruism can so quickly turn to self-preservation when the task seems too large, or when the person in need reminds us too much of our own failings. This seems to have been the jumping off point for Greta, co-written and directed by Neil Jordan (The Crying Game, Interview With The Vampire) with Ray Wright, a sort of Fatal Attraction for an adult friend.

Chloe Grace Moretz stars as Frances, a Smith College grad living in New York who must’ve majored in tasteful outfits. Frances is still dealing with the death of her mother the previous year — staring morosely out the subway window with her pronounced Cupid’s bow — when she sees that someone has left a purse on a subway seat. Frances’s roommate, Erica (Maika Monroe) a bratty rich girl who lives rent-free in her parents’ Tribeca loft, thinks Frances should just take the cash and chuck the purse. But Frances says “that’s just not the way we do things where I’m from.”

Later we learn that Frances is from Boston, which is apparently a small village of guileless altruists. Instead, Frances tracks down the purse owner, Greta Helbig, who turns out to be an exquisite French woman played by Isabelle Huppert, who lives in a brownstone decorated like a manor. Greta is a widow, grateful for the company, and she tells Frances of her departed husband and her adult daughter who doesn’t call. Greta plays Lizst on the piano, and says things like “relationships are a dream of love” with her eyes half closed. Could this be the beginning of a beautiful friendship? Lonely ol’ Greta could use a friend, and the recently-lost-her-mom Frances (offscreen dead moms continue to do the narrative heavy lifting) seems like the perfect candidate. But what happens when Greta crosses the line between need and desperation?

This is an interesting premise, and Isabelle Huppert is a bold choice as a fatal attraction May-December friendship stalker. Standing across the street from the restaurant where Frances works, staring mutely into the window while dressed elegantly in her felt overcoat and silk scarf, she looks like a cross between Lloyd Dobler from Say Anything and Paddington Bear. It’s a fun concept and a choice sight gag, but the overwhelming impression of Greta is of missed opportunity.

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