Movies

Ryan Reynolds Is Pondering One Of His Most Grueling Films During These Self-Isolating Times

The social distancing aspect of the novel coronavirus pandemic is a vital response to shutting down this disease. A lot of people at home translates to even more social media postings than usual, and the #QuarantineAMovie hashtag has taken root with people putting self-isolation-themed spins on mainstream titles. So we’re seeing ideas like Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Home as well as The Face Mask, and now, Ryan Reynolds has joined in the game while also reflecting upon one of his own movies that left him in an anxiety-ridden puddle while filming.

The movie on the Deadpool actor’s mind would be 2010’s Buried, which saw him literally box-bound (as he previously told Parade) for weeks of filming. He portrayed a U.S. civilian truck driver in Iraq, and things did not turn out well for the guy despite all efforts to free himself after being buried alive. [SPOILER ALERT] He was not only terrorized by an invading snake, but several cell phone calls didn’t save him from inevitably being covered in suffocating dirt. This movie was possibly one of the most gut-wrenching viewing experiences in cinematic history. Reynolds perfectly conveyed his character’s desperation, and it was heartbreaking to watch.

In keeping with the self-isolation Twitter theme, Reynolds obviously didn’t need to change anything in Buried‘s title to include the movie in the hashtag.

When one Twitter user mentioned how angered she was by the movie’s ending, Reynolds responded, “Imagine how I felt.”

Reynolds has previously discussed how “spending 17 straight days in a heightened state of anxiety and panic” left him “pretty jittery.” He added, “I definitely struggled with a lot of insomnia when I was working on this film.” Considering that a lot of folks are enduring sleepless nights while worrying about this pandemic, Buried is probably not a movie that anyone should actually watch right now. However, Reynolds does have some fuzzier things to say about The Voices, in which he bounced between listening to his character’s talking cat (evil) or talking dog (good) while growing increasingly unhinged.

He even described The Voices as “weird and fun and beautiful,” so if you’re looking for something to watch during your own self-isolation, there you go.

×