DJ Quik Explains Why He Spazzed On YG Over ‘My N*gga’ Song Credits

Managing Hip-Hop Editor
08.11.16 2 Comments

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DJ Quik looks to set the record straight regarding his recent remarks claiming he hasn’t been properly credited for his work on YG’s “My N****.”

On Monday, the Safe + Sound producer fired off a string of tweets accusing YG, Jeezy, Stampede Management and basically any who has listened to the chart-topping song with shorting him his credits for engineering on the hit song and the platinum plaque he claims he’s owed. He later recanted via Twitter on Wednesday night but the damage was done.

Now, Quik’s going beyond 140 characters to expand on what he claims transpired during the creation of the track. He contends that while he may not have created the final version of the song, he was the one who took it from a “muddy” YouTube version to a cleaned up version more ready for the next stage. He tells Billboard it all went down in a studio session that also included him actually working as a makeshift motivator for YG to spit the verses.

“I made it really dynamic, cleaned it, did all the little stuff that needed to be done. Then I stemmed it out. That’s a term that sound guys use when you have to make it easy for someone to remix. Instead of them having this whole jumbled console full of one hi-hat here, one horn sound over there, you put them in stereo stems so it all makes sense…I made it super easy and super loud so anybody could’ve technically mixed it.”

The Quikster later says that YG’s camp told him they ended up having another part put the final mix on the song, which he’s cool with. As long as he and other young engineers he states were involved are properly credited, and thus compensated for their work.

“He didn’t do anything different, what I have on tape versus what they have on tape…I don’t want to get in a pissing match. I’m just disappointed that [YG] didn’t even give me — or the other engineers in the studio — the simple engineer credit. That’s just disrespectful. Those kids are in there working for that credit. They hear the record on the radio all the time! All they’ve got is that credit – that’ll get them more work on other projects. That’s how this business works. We can’t keep f—ing over the studio world. If they go out of business, music is gonna go to hell.”

The tweets everyone saw on Monday were from a moment “by an emotional cat” who wanted to protect his work. “Now I don’t want to go in the studio anymore. I’m over it. It’s not even worth it…It’s changed the way I do business.”

“I’m not a ghost writer or a ghost engineer,” Quik said. “If you want somebody to be a ghost engineer, go get a ghost.”

(Via Billboard)

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