Why Riches And Fame Won’t Stop Young Rappers From Making Bad Choices

05.17.19 1 month ago

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The Rolling Loud Festival’s stint in Miami last weekend wasn’t an entirely festive occasion. Troubled rapper Kodak Black was arrested by federal authorities before he was set to perform for allegedly lying on a federal gun application. Baton Rouge rapper Youngboy NBA’s camp was involved in a dispute that led to an innocent bystander being killed by Youngboy’s security. Memphis rapper Key Glock was arrested on gun and drug charges. Young Thug’s party bus was shot in a drive-by, while Chicago rapper Hellabandz was killed in Miami during the same weekend.

Though the madness can’t be attributed to Rolling Loud, the close sequence of events prompted Meek Mill, a willing mentor to the new generation of MCs, to state on his IG story, “is y’all n—-s crime bosses or millionaires pick one.” He added, “I got real youngins in the street dying to make it out and take y’all places and take care of some families.” But Meek should know better than to present a reductive binary like that. He’s from Philly, where predecessors like Beanie Sigel, Cassidy, and Spade-O of Major Figgas couldn’t escape legal binds even after “making it out,” and others faced the fate of promising rapper Spittage, who was shot and killed by a stray bullet in 2006. Making it out of the streets is one obstacle, but staying away from gun violence and other drama is easier said than done for artists whose image and music caters to the streets. It’s easy to question the behavior of artists who constantly find themselves in legal trouble and violent situations, but it’s much harder to come up with practical solutions for the social factors that cause their dysfunction.

Kodak and Youngboy’s recklessness, in particular, has prompted many to wonder what it will take for them and other young, troubled artists to “get it” and change the way they move before it’s too late. But the reality is that in their minds, there may be no “it” for them to get. People can only aspire for what they desire, not what others want for them. There’s no windfall of cash that comes with insight on how to undo years of past conditioning from being in the streets. The kind of money rap stars make is undoubtedly life-changing, but it’s not always changing for the better. Financial freedom can often become a prison, annexing artists within a circle of enablers who won’t give them the tough love that they need to hear or tell them that they’re making the wrong life choices. As we’ve recently seen with Tekashi 6ix9ine, money and power can intensify your worst traits and lead you down a darker path than you were before.

Kodak Black and Youngboy NBA are two artists in particular who have consistently run into trouble since becoming signed artists. Kodak Black released one of the most well-regarded albums of 2018 with the spiritually plagued Dying To Live, but he’s currently out on bail while facing 30 years in a Georgia sexual assault case, and 10 years for lying on a federal gun application. He was arrested two weeks ago in New York state on gun and drug charges after accidentally crossing the US-Canada border en route to a show. Days later, his tour bus was raided by the FBI while he was performing in DC, and authorities retrieved four Glocks and arrested five people. Last Saturday, he was arrested at Rolling Loud and charged with twice lying on federal applications to purchase weapons by stating that he wasn’t under indictment. According to his legal team, Kodak was confused with the application because “he was charged directly by prosecutors, not by a grand jury indictment, in South Carolina,” as the Miami Herald reports. That’s a level of semantics that no one should ever want to find themselves arguing.

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